Saturday, November 3, 2012

Saturday Share...Double Headpins

Happy Saturday, everyone!  For today's installment of Saturday Share, I decided to write up a quick and easy tutorial for the double headpins (for lack of a better name) that I use in connecting components, such as layered pieces or discs.  I have had several folks ask how certain pieces are connected and I thought this would be a good forum to share!



After struggling with balled headpins in connecting layered pieces and discs, I had a brainstorm one day.  What if, instead of balling up the end of 1 piece of wire, I somehow melted/fused 2 pieces so that I could use both "tails" to better stabilize my components to the base?  Imagine my surprise, that after twisting the wire together and sticking it in the torch, just like normal torched headpins, it worked!

Here is my method...start with a piece of copper wire.  I like 22 or 20 gauge.  Fold it in half, press together and twist until you have about an inch twisted.  Torch until you have the size ball you  want, quench, and untwist! Simple, huh!




It really is!  Things to watch for...make sure the wire is touching throughout your twist. Any segments that do not fully come into contact with the other wire will melt through, leaving you with a single pin, or worse, will cause the balled-end to fall off.  If you are using scrap wire, you don't have to loop at the end, just twist the 2 together, but make sure the very tips are touching. 

If you want to enamel the ball, do so as you would with regular torched pins, before you quench.

I thought this would only work with copper or fine silver, due to their fusing capabilities, but decided to try sterling silver and it works!  It also works with brass/bronze.

Layer your components in your desired configuration...thread double headpin through the holes and make sure you have a good fit.


With these 1-holed components, I wrapped the tails around my base form...usually in the opposite direction for a stronger and closer connection.



When I use a flat base to connect to, like these earrings, I like to punch 2 holes, like a button, and thread each tail through their respective holes, then on the back, flatten them and tightly coil them.  Since the ends are exposed with this method, you have to make sure any sharp edges or burs are filed.  I squeeze with my nylon-jawed pliers to work harden, then I usually tumble to strengthen as well.


There you have it!! I am sure that I am not the 1st one to figure this out!!  It is a really versatile technique and can be used in all sorts of ways!  I want to try fusing several strands together and do some wire weaving, but that's another day!

Thanks for stopping by...If you have any questions, let me know!

Melissa Meman
Melismatic Art Jewelry
Art. Life. Love

29 comments :

  1. What an excellent idea! It's very generous of you to share your trade secrets with us!Thank you.

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  2. Well how darn clever is that - I'll definitely be givng it a go. Thanks Melissa.

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  3. Brilliant you clever girl. Thank you so much for sharing your technique.

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  4. Awesome Melissa, thanks for sharing!!

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  5. Awesome idea! Now I just have get a torch.

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  6. Well isn't that clever and thank you SOOOO much for sharing Melissa! I have a necklace I made with bead soup components and stacked beads and copper flowers - they spin and it drives me crazy! Now I can fix it!!!

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  7. How clever and thanks SOOOO much for sharing Melissa! I have a bead soup swap necklace I made with lampwork beads and copper flowers, the components twist with the headpin I used to hold them together. It drives me CRAZY, now I can fix it!

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  8. LOVE this!! What a great tip - I will definitely be trying this!

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  9. So cool, Melissa! Thanks for the tips!

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  10. Brilliant! Simple brilliant. I want to go try that now.

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  11. Thanks, Now I know what to do with all the lampwork disc and disc flowers that I have.

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  12. Oh, Melissa, how wonderfully clever and ingenious! Thank you for such a fantastic tutorial!

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  13. Very cool idea Melissa~and you are wonderful to share~

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  14. Thank you so much for sharing - fabulous post!

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  15. I just had a thought for those of us who haven't ventured into using fire...polymer clay might work on the ends of the folded wire too. I might have to try this.

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  16. That is so great! Thank you so much for sharing! I just love this idea!

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  17. I agree, Brilliant sums it up. Definitely using this idea! Thanks for sharing.

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  18. I had tried something like this on a glass disc bead but it did not work as good as twisting. Thanks for pursuing this I will try again. I have lots of ideas that needed this and just could not get it right.

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  19. Brilliant! Thanks for letting all of us benifit from your experiments!

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  20. Wow, Thanks so much for sharing!

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  21. So THAT's how you do it!!, You are so totally awesome for sharing this! Thank you!

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  22. Brilliant! Thank you so much for sharing!

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  23. That is an awesome technique! I might have to try something similar with polymer clay as the tip. I don't know if it will hold up, but there's one way to find out! :)

    Thank you!
    <3,
    Andrea

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